What is sacred? For some people, nothing. Nothing is sacred anymore. Or for others it is their sacred cup of coffee, their sacred day off, or their sacred Sunday afternoon of football. The implication of sacred? Don’t mess with it. If you take it away from me, I will be very unhappy.

It is something that we do with regularity that we don’t wish to do without. It gives us something to enjoy in our lives pushed to the edge. But what makes that cup of coffee, that day off, those hours of TV so worthy of veneration? It does something for us—it gives us something to look forward to, which helps bring fulfillment and happiness into our lives.

How easy is it for you to make the leap from sacred to happiness? For many this is probably somewhat difficult. We might have a negative reaction to the word sacred. Perhaps it was a forced veneration of something that we didn’t understand, something held away from us so we wouldn’t mess it up—like sacred objects in a church, or for me, my older brother’s stuff.

What is sacred to others may not be sacred to you. I’ve never really fully appreciated the hymns we sang in my father’s church as much as my parents do. But does that lessen the importance or sacredness of that music? Absolutely not, for that music is a vehicle for others to get to their joy, and I deeply respect what it does for them. What’s going on for them isn’t what’s going on for me, but it is still going on.

What IS important is that we have a desire to bring happiness, fulfillment, joy, peace or love into our lives—and then pay attention to what works. We must start noticing those things that lead us to those places of upliftment, and we most hold them sacred. Don’t mess with them. Do them regularly, but most importantly, NOTICE what these activities or objects do for you. For without the association of what it does for us, they are only things, actions or time spent.

Music has a direct effect upon our consciousness, whether we believe it or not. Negative music will bring you down (assuming that you were somewhat up to begin with), pop music will get you going (unless you’re already spinning too fast), and listening to Alan Silvestri’s music while watching Castaway will make you cry over a volleyball.

Knowing that music has great power, we need to start paying attention to what it does. If it leads you to your deepest desire, then hold it sacred, and use it! Don’t turn your sacred music into a reliquary, where it doesn’t get touched for fear of messing it up.

That’s that awesome thing about even the greatest music ever composed. It was meant to be butchered in practice. And no matter how badly it gets mauled, the music, and more importantly the inspiration behind the music, still shows up on stage or in your playlist, or better yet, deep within your inner headphones none the worse for wear, pristine and fresh regardless of how many notes have been missed in practice.

Why is the sacred so important? It allows us to access that deeper place within ourselves that only the sacred can touch.

Is it important to tell the world what is sacred to you and expect them to have the same veneration? It won’t mean a thing to them without their own deep experience. But what IS important that we share our results. Share your joy, your happiness, your vibration. We all need it.

Find your sacred. Use it. Share what comes.

 

Find Your Sacred. Use It.

3 thoughts on “Find Your Sacred. Use It.

  • November 26, 2013 at 6:37 am
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    Hello David,
    Enjoyed the article. Well done! I always enjoy a writing that teaches me a new word: reliquary! I’ve never heard that word before. I’ve often had the thought that “things become sacred when we make them sacred”. The science of yoga defines sexuality as a “sacred, creative force”. Think of how many of society’s problems stem from illegitimate birth. We need a “sacred revolution” and you are contributing to it one note at a time. Blessings, Frank

    Reply
  • November 29, 2013 at 12:33 pm
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    This is really beautiful David, I love it:-)

    Reply
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